Homemade Fresh Ricotta Cheese

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Crumbly, crystalline aged cheeses and cheeses bearing that ripe, in-your-face (and up-your-nose) funk — to both I say yes, please, and thank you very much.

Then there are the light and fresh cheeses. So quintessentially summer, with simple recipes to match the laid-back warm weather vibe.

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Savory Strawberry Pizza with Spinach, Chives, Chillies + Halloumi

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

As it goes every year, I’m shocked to find that early May marks the drawdown of strawberries. Blueberries come on in branch-bending bunches in the nick of time to be sure, but for as long as we can, it’s all about those fresh-picked reds.

With today’s recipe, we give them a savory turn on a #fridaynightpizza that evokes the flavors of spring.

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Multi-Grain + Seed English Muffins

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

With a little advance planning and patience, but not too much, homemade English muffins enhance any simple morning (or afternoon or evening) at home (or picnic or other gathering)!

This recipe, modified to our liking over many years, has become our standard. Replete with whole grains and seeds, it’s the fluffy comfort classic sneakily made healthier.

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Browned Butter Pomegranate Rose Madeleines

Eat Well Edibles Recipe

Anatole France, a French poet, journalist, and Nobel Prize-winning novelist, once remarked: “Life is too short and Proust is too long.”

Published in a series of seven volumes between the years 1913 and 1927, Marcel Proust’s novel Remembrance of Things Past is a narrated telling of his own (fictionalized) life story. More than 4,000 pages, it is indeed a very challenging read. His allegorical search for truth is defined by the concept of “involuntary memory” — literally, spontaneous remembrances of things past, flashbacks, triggered by everyday actions, sights, sounds, tastes, smells.

The most famous of Proust’s literary recollections, an evocation of a profound childhood remembrance upon tasting a crumbly, tea-dipped madeleine.*

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Cream Scones with Fresh Figs, Cardamom and Black Pepper

Eat Well Edibles Grow Well Recipe

Nine years ago this September, my parents and I set off in the early morning hours down the interstate. Minneapolis — grad school + dietetic internship — or bust. Suitcases, boxes, and bags filled with far too many belongings for my new garden-level studio were deftly organized into the two cars by my father, our packing engineer. Thoughtfully, he left enough room for myself, a very large coffee, and a parting gift from my mother: her extra copy of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook.

Being in the kitchen is more than a passion and reminder of loved ones who helped make it so, but, for me, also a stress reliever. And though my subterranean shoebox boasted nothing beyond the basics — refrigerator, sink, an appropriately tiny gas oven/stove, and literally zero counter space — cooking, along with walks and the best café miel, was my delicious escape from reality. My smart mum, she just knew that Marion Cunningham’s classic would keep me well fed. And sane.

Fannie and I got on instantly, and she remains an anchor cookbook to this day. I have made so many of her recipes, both as printed and as variations on a theme, with honestly not one failure. Or at least not a failure on her part — burning my palm almost to the third degree on a metal skillet handle and destroying its contents was not instructed. The signs of heavy use are plain to see in the cracked spine (apologies, lots of love), spattered pages (decoration), scribbled notes (words of praise), and the occasional small cloud of flour that falls when opened to certain pages (baking pixie dust).

Scone cut-outs_HGN

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